A Commentary on the Homeric Hymn to Hermes: Introduction, Text and Commentary (Texte und Kommentare, Band 41)

A Commentary on the Homeric Hymn to Hermes: Introduction, Text and Commentary (Texte und Kommentare, Band 41)

Athanassios Vergados

Language: English

Pages: 733

ISBN: 2:00272070

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


excellent edition. thanks to original uploader. ebook retails at $182. hardcover retails at $182. something has to give in academic publishing!
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Aims and Scope

The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems. In just 580 lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a hymn to himself, travels from Cyllene to Pieria to steal Apollo’s cattle, organizes a feast at the river Alpheios where he serves the meat of two of the stolen animals, cunningly defends his innocence, and is finally reconciled to Apollo, to whom he gives the lyre in exchange for the cattle. This book provides the first detailed commentary devoted specifically to this unusual poem since Radermacher’s 1931 edition. The commentary pays special attention to linguistic, philological, and interpretive matters. It is preceded by a detailed introduction that addresses the Hymn’s ideas on poetry and music, the poem’s humour, the Hymn’s relation to other archaic hexameter literature both in thematic and technical aspects, the poem’s reception in later literature, its structure, the issue of its date and place of composition, and the question of its transmission. The critical text, based on F. Càssola’s edition, is equipped with an apparatus of formulaic parallels in archaic hexameter poetry as well as possible verbal echoes in later literature.

Athanassios Vergados, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany, andNational and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.

xiv, 718 pages
Language: English, Ancient Greek
Type of Publication: Commentary
Keywords: Homeric Hymns; Hermes; Poetry; Greek; Religion

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out of twenty-four) are found in the Works and Days. For possible allusions to Hesiod, see p. 67–70. 1 (Th./Op.; cf. Od. 8.429 $ « ), 17  ) « (Op.), 19 (Op.), 30 (Op.), 31 (Th.), 44 « (Th.; used of Hermes), 47 (Op.), 67 φ (Op.), 46 (Op.), 80 Νφ (fr.), 80 (fr.), 98 « (Op.), 105 φ (Op.), 112 » (Op.), 146 « (Sc.), 158 « (Sc., fr.), 159 (Op.), 338 (Op.), 342 (fr.), 372 « (Op.), 495 « (fr.), 498 « (Th.), 557 (Op.), 559 (Th.) 4.1.1.3 Words and phrases used differently in h.Herm. than in Homer and/or

332, 336, 370, 378, 382, 384, 438, 455, 466, 472, 478, 482, 512, 567. (ii) There is also a high number of parenthetic phrases; cf. 76, 80, 165, 208, 289, 315–18, 376, 378, 426, 430, 549. 4.1.2 Formulaic phrases15 Here I concentrate on phrases that present special interest. The interpretation of some of the following data is necessarily subjective, but I believe it is reasonable to draw the following conclusions. The poet of h.Herm. sometimes creates new phrases or re-interprets old ones. He

places, is violated at the following verses: 4 ( φ ), 23 ( φ «), 81 ( λ «), 100 (M ), 107 (  # ), 354 ( μ # φ ), 380 ( μ #$ «), 384 ( ), 398 ( # # #A φ ), 510 (² # ). Hilberg’s Law, that when there is word-end at position 4, the preceding biceps is disyllabic, is not observed at the following lines: 1( ), 18 « (guaranteed), 20 ( ), 52 (cf. 20), 142 ( ρ #), 266 ), 336 ( ), 356 (cf. 20), 429 ( Υ ), 443 ( Υ ), 475 ( ), ( 579 ( ). At 366 the version of the verse cited in some manu( o ); cf. Il.

(Il. 2.506), where we hear of a P $ μ Ν « (cf. h.Herm. 186–87 #O … Ν « | 4 μ φ ). Schachter (1986, II 215 n. 1) points out that a late date for h.Herm. (i.e. after the sixth century) would be incompatible with the archaeological evidence regarding Poseidon’s cult at Onchestos, unless the poet was purposefully archaizing, and (ibid. p. 212) emphasizes the rustic nature of Onchestos as presented in h.Herm. as 67 Forderer (1958, 100): “A particular poetic style lies indeed in the entire complex of

Euboea as the place of composition. He restored the form π at 400, and due to its similarity with that occurs on an inscription from Oropus (IG VII 235.16) he suggested that this form, along with » of 255, supported the view that the poet was an Ionian from Euboea.76 However, the form π is not particularly Euboean (it can be paralleled by $ , ), while » is not guaranteed since our MSS preserve unanimously » at 212. Hence this isolated form cannot be used as a basis for an argument. Ionian origin

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