Animals as Food: (Re)connecting Production, Processing, Consumption, and Impacts (The Animal Turn)

Animals as Food: (Re)connecting Production, Processing, Consumption, and Impacts (The Animal Turn)

Language: English

Pages: 210

ISBN: 1611861748

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Every day, millions of people around the world sit down to a meal that includes meat. This book explores several questions as it examines the use of animals as food: How did the domestication and production of livestock animals emerge and why? How did current modes of raising and slaughtering animals for human consumption develop, and what are their consequences? What can be done to mitigate and even reverse the impacts of animal production? With insight into the historical, cultural, political, legal, and economic processes that shape our use of animals as food, Fitzgerald provides a holistic picture and explicates the connections in the supply chain that are obscured in the current mode of food production. Bridging the distance in animal agriculture between production, processing, consumption, and their associated impacts, this analysis envisions ways of redressing the negative effects of the use of animals as food. It details how consumption levels and practices have changed as the relationship between production, processing, and consumption has shifted. Due to the wide-ranging questions addressed in this book, the author draws on many fields of inquiry, including sociology, (critical) animal studies, history, economics, law, political science, anthropology, criminology, environmental science, geography, philosophy, and animal science.

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Attend Public Schools That Are Located Near Confined Swine Feeding Operations”; Donham et al., “Community Health and Socioeconomic Issues Surrounding Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations.” 104. Mirabelli et al., “Asthma Symptoms among Adolescents Who Attend Public Schools That Are Located Near Confined Swine Feeding Operations.” 105. Tietz, “Boss Hog.” 106. Donham et al., “Community Health and Socioeconomic Issues Surrounding Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations.” 107. Green et al.,

not exceeding acreage limits. In their thorough analysis of these policies, Winders and Nibert conclude that, while these acts were successful in improving farm incomes, they stimulated further production instead of controlling it.14 This unintended consequence occurred because the policies limited the amount of acreage that could be used for production, but not the amount of the product that they could produce. Farmers therefore intensified production on the amount of land they were able to use

industries played a role. The banking industry contributed significantly to the industrialization of animal agriculture because in the past, and still today, they look more favorably on the industrialized model of animal agriculture and are more likely to grant loans in that direction. As farming became increasingly capital-­intensive and the integrator companies became ascendant, farmers have increasingly needed to take out loans to be competitive. In addition to domestic banking policies,

hog producer in the nation during the ten years he served in the state General Assembly. His farm had been the first to industrialize pig production in the 1960s. He developed an integrated operation where he provided his contract farmers with the feed and the pigs for them to grow. Then he took the animals back when they were full grown while the farmers kept the manure. His farm is also credited with designing a building to confine pigs all day based on the model of chicken CAFOs.119 The

While this type of farming sounds good in theory, many are quick to question whether it is economically viable and able to compete with industrial agriculture. Direct comparisons are difficult to make, but the literature that is available indicates that sustainable agriculture can be competitive and that the demand for organic and sustainable food has increased dramatically in recent years: demand in the United States quadrupled between the years of 1997 and 2008 alone.45 Community-­supported

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