The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge Companions to Literature)

The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy (Cambridge Companions to Literature)

Language: English

Pages: 410

ISBN: 0521423511

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This book presents ancient Greek tragedy in the context of late-twentieth-century reading, criticism and performance. The twelve chapters, written by seven distinguished scholars, cover tragedy as an institution in the civic life of ancient Athens, a range of approaches to the surviving plays, and changing patterns of reception, adaptation and performance from antiquity to the present.

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or, more puzzlingly, as 'townswomen'. They were never granted the full rights and corresponding duties of active political citizenship that they would have required to participate in the governmental arenas of Assembly or People's Court. There, in part, lies the black humour of Aristophanes' Women in Assembly, which has probably mistakenly been seen as partaking of the same 'feminist' tendency as Plato's Republic. In this comic fantasy (or nightmare scenario) formerly respectable citizen wives in

Press 978-0-521-42351-9 - The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy Edited by P. E. Easterling Frontmatter More information © Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-42351-9 - The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy Edited by P. E. Easterling Frontmatter More information © Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-42351-9 - The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy Edited by P. E. Easterling Frontmatter More

than a guess as to the stamina of the performers. E.g. Seaford (1984) 1. Cf. Nagy (1990) 391: 'a subordinated attachment of tragedy'. The Trackers of Oxyrhynchus, first performed at Delphi in 1988, followed by performances 38 Cambridge Companions Online © Cambridge University Press, 2006 A show for Dionysus and drink, sex, jokes, as well as hard political or moral or existential problems? To worship Dionysus? That is, to enact the success of the followers of Dionysus in escaping the wicked

tragedy he heeds their admonition barbarically to sacrifice a high-born female virgin (399-409). 64 Throughout the tragic corpus speakers disrupt the dominant ideological assumptions about women. Euripides even seems to have been aware that much of the blame for the bad reputation of women in myth must be laid at the feet of the male poets who had created them (Med. 420-30). His Medea includes a supremely negative portrait of a vituperative, vindictive, and murderous female, which could only be

share the acting, and Sophocles later brought in a third.4 The texts of nearly all the plays from the Oresteia onwards suggest that they were composed to be performed by a maximum of three speaking actors, and there is no external evidence for the regular use of more. How can this tradition be explained if not as some kind of restriction on the freedom of dramatists? In fact it makes best sense if it is understood in relation to performance in masks. The origins and symbolic significance of

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